Hurley

Fort Collins, Colorado (Larimer County)

Last Updated: 08/21/2020
4 / 5 ( 4 reviews )
Information
Nearby Trails
Status: Temporary Closure
Typically Open: Year Round
Length: 1.9 miles
Highest Elevation: 9833 feet
Duration: About 30 minutes
Shape of Trail: Out & Back
Best Direction to Travel: N/A
Nearest Town: Fort Collins
Nearest Town w/ Services: Fort Collins
Official Road Name: 352
Management Agency: Roosevelt National Forest
District: Canyon Lakes Ranger District
Showing 0 trails within 2 miles

Highlights

Highlight: Hurley
In 2012, the High Park Fire consumed 88,000 acres of forest in the Roosevelt National Forest west of Fort Collins, Colorado. Heavy fire damage happened along the northern edge of the Buckhorn Canyon at Pennock Pass. Some of the off-road routes in this area remain closed today following the fire. Hurley, however, begins near the top of Pennock Pass but heads to the south and was unaffected by the fire. This is a short, heavily forested trail that offers great solitude and does not see much use. The trail is rocky, but not difficult.

Video

Weather

7 day forecast for Hurley

Route Information

Technical Rating:
(MODERATE )

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Waypoints

1. Hurley Trailhead (0 mi)
The trailhead runs to the south off the Buckhorn Canyon Road. The trailhead is at Pennock Pass, the highest point along the Buckhorn Canyon. Looking north from Buckhorn Canyon, you can see evidence of the 88,000 acre High Park fire from 2012. The forest south of Buckhorn Canyon, including Hurley, was not affected by the massive forest fire.

Directions to Trailhead

Trailhead Coordinates: 40.577607, -105.513226

Starting Point: Masonville, Colorado

Go west on Larimer County Road 27 (Buckhorn Road) 10.6 miles. Veer left onto Larimer County Road 44H, the Buckhorn Canyon Road. At this intersection, the road turns to dirt. Continue west on the dirt Buckhorn Canyon Road for 15.2 miles. Hurley takes off to the south (left) and is marked as USFS Road # 352.

Camping

Dispersed

Trail Reviews (8)

Author: Official Crew
Status: Temporary Closure
Offroaded on:
The Cameron Peak fire west of Fort Collins continues to grow prompting additional closures to the Roosevelt National Forest. The trail is affected by the Forest Closure Order effective 08-20-2020. Ongoing information about the fire, it’s progress, evacuations and closures can be found at Inciweb.gov website.

Author:
Status: Open
Offroaded on:
Rating:
This is a great, rocky, tougher trail. Ran it with my 4Runner (stock tire size & 1.5” lift), and I definitely used the skid plates. Multiple hits along the way. Lots of exposed, loose rocks. With a lower lift, I had to pay very close attention and pick lines carefully. It had my heart rate up that’s for sure.

Author:
Status: Open
Offroaded on:
Rating:
Where the road splits looks like an abandoned hobo camp and needs to be cleaned up. This is the first time I came up this trail. If it wasn't so far from my house, I might try to get my trailer up there to haul out the trash. If anybody else is up to the task, bring a hammer, maybe a pry bar, maybe a screw shooter to demo the plywood structure and haul out. Other than that, a few garbage bags and an hour or so of time will get the job done. Bring gloves, maybe a leaf rake. It would all fit in the bed of a pickup if you're feeling charitable. We only drove about half way down the right fork as time was running out and we had to hit the road. It would be a nice trail if not for disgusting, inconsiderate humans.

Author:
Status: Open
Offroaded on:
Rating:
Me and a group of buddies ran this trail pretty easily on the right fork. It was a lot of fun, with the hardest part being not scraping up the Jeeps too badly with Rocky Mountain Pinstriping. The left fork only my skidplated and fully armored Jeep Wrangler could complete, with rocks a foot tall surrounded by deep ruts that made some rocks almost a foot and a half tall at some points due to erosion. Most of the trail is fairly easy after the initial half mile or so. Ruts make many of the smaller rocks a larger problem than they would be otherwise. Based on the rating system the left fork could easily be a 4-5. It's a fun trail, and I would highly reccomend it to an armored and/or lifted vehicle.

Author: Official Crew
Status: Open
Offroaded on:
With last year's reviews suggesting that erosion has deepened the ruts on the left fork, I went to the trail to inspect conditions for Memorial Day Weekend. I was able to get to the fork at Waypoint 3 with only minor snow amounts lining the shaded edges of the trail. After Waypoint 3, the snow was still pretty deep needing a few more weeks to finish the spring melt. Another trip will be coming soon.

Author:
Status: Open
Offroaded on:
Rating:
Did this trail for the first time based on your 3 (easy) rating and trail info. We wanted an easy trail as one in our party requested it. The rest in the group have done trails rated 6-7 without problems. We took a left at the fork because some didn't like the idea of the right being too narrow. A couple of us decided to go up the left fork and found it much more difficult than the 6-7's we've done. Rocky, rutted with a large chance of bottoming out. Hard to pick decent lines because it is narrow. Later we tried the right fork after having to deal with a fallen tree. Pretty easy until the top. It then turned into same situation as left fork. I know ratings are subjective, but this one seems off. This is not written as a complaint, but rather as something to think about for those new to wheeling.

Author:
Status: Partially Open
Offroaded on:
Site update: 10-July-2018 Roads: A fallen tree blocks the primary road (right at fork when you enter main campground area) for only taller vehicles about a hundred feet past the main campground at the fork. A saw capable of 12 inch diameter is needed at a minimum. Safer cut at >16 inches. Left at fork (rocky looking road) has had significant rutting since I last traveled it. Many vehicles will bottom out and straddling ruts is not an option as large trees grow to the shoulders. Uneven ruts will make taller vehicles with roof racks hit trees in one location. Consider increasing the rating for the left fork of this road. Road to fork is still easy and clear. Campsite Condition: The main campsite at the fork was rather trashed. Fast food condiment packets, broken glass, shells, skeet, cigarette butts, buckets, wrappers, cans, building supplies, etc…. For four hours my wife, 4 year old son and I picked three 30 gallon garbage bags of trash from these campsites. We also removed abandoned furniture, a large amount of carpet and other large trash items. We did not have room for a beat-up recliner, some metal cowlings and a bunch of OSB lumber. If someone has a half empty truck and has time to pick up those items, thanks in advance for your help. We could have spent a solid day on the trash immediately outside the camping area at the fork. Though we made significant improvement there is still broken glass about every square foot. Be careful. Plinkers unable to plink in compliance with litter laws consider visiting these ranges where they might clean up after you: http://wheretoshootcolorado.com/ or http://cpw.state.co.us/thingstodo/Pages/ShootingRanges.aspx or https://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/arp/recreation/recarea/?recid=80588&actid=106 Please examine the USFS rules about permanent or semi-permanent structures before building latrines. We found several garbage bags of human feces. One was less than 4 days old only 20 feet from the camping area and 20 feet from the (right) road as you exit camp (on the right). I was not equipped to remove other peoples' biohazards. Benefits of latrines in high traffic areas is debated by a few as a safer alternative to many cat holes. Latrines only work if people dispose of the excrement properly. (Also these structures were only a few feet outside of camp and that is not safe) Leaving bags of human excrement and bodily fluids is not in keeping with laws or modern ethics of 4x4ing. Pack it out. First small campsite on the left of the left fork, about half a mile in, has significant glass especially in the fire ring. I was unable to deal with this one. We walked out some of the junk from the first small campsite on the right fork. It could likely use more care and I didn’t make it much past this one (on foot). There is a lot of pressure from mountain bikers and hikers to close roads to motorized use when abused. If we let campsites be trashed like this it gives the USFS strong argument to close roads or reduce the dates that roads are open. It is especially true for “Out & Back” trails like Hurley. Pack it out. Tread lightly.

Author: Official Crew
Status: Partially Open
Offroaded on:
Snow is beginning to pile up in this tree lined trail. The winter snow fall has set in for the season and only going to get worse until the spring melt comes.

Questions & Answers (0)

Writer Information

Tim Palmer

Mapping Crew - Colorado

Tim lives and works in Northern Colorado. He has owned and driven 4X4 vehicles his entire adult life including Jeeps, pick ups, ATVs and UTVs. After high school, Tim's first 4X4 was a 47 Willy's CJ-2A with a flat 4 and a 6-volt electrical system. Typically wheeling in Northern Colorado or Southern Wyoming, Tim loves being in the mountains and the back country. Because of a desire to enjoy and promote responsible off-roading and to keep it available for the future, he belongs to a local 4X4 off-road club. Being part of the Trailsoffroad.com community furthers that goal as well. A love for off-road adventures, camping, fishing, and hunting keeps Tim away from pavement and always exploring. While his wife likes the comfort of a Jeep Grand Cherokee, Tim prefers the ruggedness of the Jeep Wrangler. Although most off-road time is spent in Colorado and Wyoming, an occasional trip to the Moab area is common. Tim will spend the summer going topless and enjoying the value of the great outdoors. Amateur Radio Technician license call sign: ke0npg
For individual use only, not to be shared.