21 Road

Fruita, Colorado (Mesa County)

Last Updated: 09/28/2020
5 / 5 ( 2 reviews )
Information
Nearby Trails
Status: Open
Typically Open: Year Round
Permit Information: Permit Required - Click Here
Length: 5.09 miles
Highest Elevation: 5722 feet
Duration: About 4 hours
Shape of Trail: Out & Back
Best Direction to Travel: North
Nearest Town: Fruita
Nearest Town w/ Services: Fruita
Official Road Name: 21 Road
Management Agency: Bureau of Land Management
District: Grand Junction Field Office
Showing 0 trails within 2 miles

Highlights

Highlight: 21 Road
One of the most well-known trails on the western slope of Colorado, 21 Road is a trail that will give any driver or vehicle a challenge. The trail follows a rocky wash through Hunter Canyon, into the Book Cliffs, and gets progressively more difficult the farther you travel. Most obstacles have multiple line choices including ones that will leave you asking, "are you crazy"? Buggies and extreme Jeeps come from all over to attempt the massive boulders along the last quarter mile, but the most well-known features along this 4wd trail are the two alcoves where massive overhangs give you the feeling of driving through a cave.

Video

Weather

7 day forecast for 21 Road

Route Information

Technical Rating:
( DIFFICULT - EXTREME )

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Waypoints

1. Trailhead (0 mi)
The trail has an extremely large parking area, large enough for any sized trailer. There is a kiosk here with a map of the area, and some general information about the trail and the club who maintains it.

Directions to Trailhead

Trailhead Coordinates: 39.271331, -108.608062

Starting Point: Grand Junction, Colorado

From I-70, take Exit 26 and head west on Highway 50. Turn right on 21 Road for 3.1 miles. Turn left on K Road, followed by an immediate right back onto 21 Road. Follow the road for 8.5 miles as the road becomes dirt and passes a natural gas station on your left. The staging area will be on your left with a large kiosk.

Camping

Dispersed

Land Use Issues

Hunter Canyon is a historical home for the Great Basin Spadefoot Toad, also referred to as the 21 Road Toad. In 2001, the toad was placed on the Threatened Species list which resulted in possible closure of the canyon. Due to tireless work by the Grand Mesa Jeep Club, they were able to adopt the toad and create protected areas of habitat along the trail for the toad. Please do not drive through water puddles or through closed sections that are well marked as this could threaten the closure of the trail.

Trail Reviews (5)

Author:
Status: Open
Offroaded on:
Trail was great, it was a little confusing on where to drop in and start wheeling in the canyon. We ran this on a Monday and didn’t see a single person all day. We ran the whole trail to the end then ran it back down. We drove to the top of the mountain on the dirt road and figured it was just as fast to get back to camp if we ran the trail back down. The upper section was a blast, lots of big boulders.

Author: Official Crew
Status: Open
Offroaded on:
The trail is back open again until the final obstacle. After that, you must return to the trailhead as the optional exit through Coal Gulch is currently closed.

Author: Official Crew
Status: Temporary Closure
Offroaded on:
Trail has been closed due to the Pine Gulch fire

Author:
Status: Open
Offroaded on:
Rating:
Something for EVERYONE!! This is such a fantastic trails and it changes all the time!! Just a few miles outside of Grand Junction and a must do if you live here or if you’re visiting. You can enter and exit the trail at several places if something is too hard (or too easy!) Serious buggy stuff toward the end. Also really fun covered in snow!

Author: Official Crew
Status: Open
Offroaded on:
Rating:
My absolute favorite trail in Grand Junction! This trail changes everytime I run it. Obstacles that were difficult the last time are now easy, and obstacles that were easy are now difficult. It is also a good trail for newer wheelers who want to start getting into harder terrain as they can attempt the obstacles they want, and bail out if they find themselves in over their heads. I fully recommend making the trail an in and back out drive instead of looping all the way around, even if your vehicle is road worthy.

Questions & Answers (0)

Writer Information

Ryan Boudreau

Mapping Crew - Colorado

Hi, I'm Ryan! I am a Colorado native and I've been wheeling since I was 16 years old. I grew up with a relentless passion for all things Jeep and off road related, and that passion has never died out. I am a member of the Mile-Hi Jeep Club, Patrol 16 Sasquatch Jeepers and currently own an '06 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon Unlimited (LJ) nicknamed "Minion". I am a huge supporter of Stay the Trail and Tread Lightly, and have participated and even been in charge of many trail restoration projects. I have been a trail leader several times for events such as All-4-Fun, ColoradoFest, Set Them Free, 14er Fest, and other. I am also the creator of the Unlimited LJ Adventure. My rig is built for extreme offroading, but I love to get my tires dirty on any kind of trail whether it's rock crawling or just scenic high Alpine drives. I've wheeled all over the country including Colorado, Utah, Kansas, the Carolinas, AZ, and California. I love a great adventure, and love even more to share those adventures with others. If you see the "minion" out on the trail, make sure to stop and say hello.
For individual use only, not to be shared.