Coyote Canyon Lower - Anza

Borrego Springs, California (San Diego County)

Last Updated: 06/07/2018
4.4 / 5 ( 7 reviews )
Information
Nearby Trails
Status: Open
Typically Open: 10/01 - 05/31
Length: 6.6 miles
Highest Elevation: 1250 feet
Duration: About 3 hours
Shape of Trail: Connector
Best Direction to Travel: North
Nearest Town: Borrego Springs
Nearest Town w/ Services: Borrego Springs
Official Road Name: Coyote Canyon
Management Agency: Anza-Borrego Desert State Park
District: Anza-Borrego Desert State Park
Showing 0 trails within 2 miles

Highlights

Highlight: Coyote Canyon Lower - Anza
Lower Coyote Canyon is a popular trail on the west side of Anza Borrego. Known for its water crossings year-round, this lush area of the desert is always fun to travel. Coyote Canyon was named by Captain Juan Bautista De Anza during his overland exploration where he camped in this area on March 14, 1774. In 1775, Anza lead a colonizing expedition of 240 people and 800+ heads of livestock. Coyote Canyon closes from June 1st to September 30th to preserve the watering rights of the desert bighorn sheep.

Video

Weather

7 day forecast for Coyote Canyon Lower - Anza

Route Information

Technical Rating:
( MODERATE )

Read more about our rating system

Waypoints

1. Dirt Road (0 mi)
Beginning of Coyote Canyon where the asphalt turns to dirt.

Directions to Trailhead

Trailhead Coordinates: 33.327130, -116.367497

Starting Point: Borrego Springs, CA

From the Borrego Springs Circle, head east on Palm Canyon Drive for a 1/2 mile and turn left onto Di Giorgio Road. Take Di Giorgio Road north roughly 4.7 miles to the beginning of Coyote Canyon.

Camping

Dispersed

Land Use Issues

Coyote Canyon closes from June 1st to September 30th to preserve the watering rights of the Desert Bighorn Sheep.

Trail Reviews (7)

Author:
Status: Open
Offroaded on:
Rating:
Fun trail with some interesting history. We liked the fact that the vegetation changed as you proceed through the trail. Water crossing were shallow. The third crossing was the only one with water. Loved the history of Anza camping here in 1774.

Author:
Status: Open
Offroaded on:
Rating:
Only the third crossing had water in it. Everything was relatively easy but further down the track there were areas where 4x4 and some clearance was needed. Doable in a decent SUV I would say. Really is pretty and the third crossing was fun in the dark.

Author:
Status: Open
Offroaded on:
Rating:
Did the trail for the first time but ran it with others that had done it many times. The 3 water crossings were full of water and fun. Not to deep so no water on the floorboards of the 4runner. Like the previous reviewer stated, the boulder climb was apparently graded by the park service. It is much easier now, but you should really run in it with 4wd with clearance.

Author:
Status: Open
Offroaded on:
Rating:
Great trail, but at this time of year there was hardly any water in any of the crossings. It sure was windy and it was about 95 degrees at night. My stock Silverado Trail Boss did this trail just fine without needing 4 low at all. I probably could have made it in 2wd I think, as long as you don't stop in some of the sandy areas. I definitely plan on going back though when the flowers are out in the spring.

Author:
Status: Open
Offroaded on:
Rating:
Beautiful area to drive through and the water crossings, although shallow at this time of year, kept things exciting. Before actually driving the trail, we were concerned about bringing along a friend with their stock late model Grand Cherokee 4X4, but he ended up having no problems whatsoever.

Author:
Status: Open
Offroaded on:
Rating:
Wow! Super sad. Boulder Alley is no more. They have totally wrecked the trail. Should be called Decomposed Granite Expessway. Was so forlorn at the loss of the ‘great people filter’ that I nearly failed to enjoy water at all three crossings. Kind of at a loss for words. Another one bites the dust. Don’t get me wrong, the land and route is beautiful, I guess I am just resistant to change.

Author:
Status: Open
Offroaded on:
Rating:
Trail was in great shape. Creek was flowing at three of the crossings.

Questions & Answers (4)

Q: How deep is the water crossing #2 around this time?
–White JK (02/24/2019)
–Josh Noesser (02/24/2019)
Q: Looking for a day trip for our Jeep club leaving out of Hwy 79 near Warner Springs. Is this easy to get to from that area?
–Shannon (01/06/2019)
–Josh Noesser (01/06/2019)
Q: The rocky climb after the 3rd wash, does it have a name?
–Alex (11/26/2018)
–Josh Noesser (11/27/2018)
Q: to the community: I've been told that drone photography is permitted in Coyote Canyon. Is that correct?
–Patricia Garver (08/04/2018)
–Joe Stasney (02/09/2019)
–Josh Noesser (08/04/2018)

Writer Information

Josh Noesser

Mapping Crew - California

Joshua Noesser grew up in Southern California but has lived in different parts of the country during his young adult life. Josh was first turned to four wheeling when he road with one of his friends dad up Surprise Canyon in the Panamint Valley at age14. After nearly 3 different roll overs later and a half dozen intense waterfalls, Josh was hooked. At 16 he purchased his first Jeep a CJ 7 and by 17 was putting his first locker in it. Currently, Josh is the owner and CEO of Nybble, an IT Solutions Company based in Orange County, California. Nybble isn't your normal IT company where everyone stays in and plays video games. Nybble's average company trip is out on the trails since a good amount of his staff enjoy wheeling too. As Josh likes to say, he offers the only IT Company with the ability to provide services in extreme locations. "If you want a server at the top of The Hammers, we will take care of that for you." Today you can find Josh out on the trail behind the wheel in one of his three different off-road vehicles. See the vehicles below for more information. If you ever run into Josh, please say high, he is a very friendly person and is always happy to have a new person join the group.
For individual use only, not to be shared.