Rice Peak FR# 29

Oracle, Arizona (Pima County)

Last Updated: 10/09/2017
Information
Nearby Trails
Status: Open
Typically Open: Year Round
Length: 5.4 miles
Highest Elevation: 7493 feet
Duration: About 2 hours
Shape of Trail: Out & Back
Best Direction to Travel: West
Nearest Town: Oracle
Nearest Town w/ Services: Oracle
Official Road Name: 29,29C,4472,4483
Management Agency: Coronado National Forest
District: Santa Catalina Ranger District
Showing 0 trails within 2 miles

Highlights

Highlight: Rice Peak FR# 29

Nestled in the foothills of the north side of the Santa Catalina Mountains is one of the truly outstanding and challenging trails near Tucson. The trail begins in a lush riparian area and slowly climbs up and out of the canyon onto a ridge, which increasingly gains altitude until you reach the hair-raising steep hill climb that leads you to the summit. The serious obstacles have been removed by "trail maintenance" rendering the trail less challenging. You should be able to complete this trail in under two hours. If you love Arizona scenery and don't mind a little effort to get to it, this is the trail for you!

Video

Weather

7 day forecast for Rice Peak FR# 29

Route Information

Technical Rating:
(MODERATE )

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Waypoints

1. Rice Peak Trailhead (0.00 mi)

Directly across the road from Peppersauce Campground is the start of the Rice Peak trail. The sign says RICE PEAK 7, but that's incorrect. The trail is 5.4 miles long from here to the tip of the peak.

Directions to Trailhead

Trailhead Coordinates: 32.537759, -110.718260

Starting Point: Start at the USFS Peppersauce campground.

Start at the Mount Lemmon Control Road Trail in Oracle. You will begin your Rice peak Journey at Waypoint 7, 9.7 Miles from the start of that trail. The Rice Peak trail starts immediately across the road from the Peppersauce Campground.

Camping

Dispersed

Land Use Issues

This trail is currently open and was not directly impacted by the Burro Fire. Map of the Fire Area
Pima County Road Closure Information
Pima County Road Hotline (Recording): 520-547-7510 As for permit requirements "Usually none", this trail is located entirely in the Coronado National Forest.

Trail Reviews (3)

Author:
Status: Open
Offroaded on:
Fun trail with amazing views along the entire trail. I don't have any pictures (battery died). Please write a review and add your pictures. Although Dead Man's Drop is no longer this trail still has a good steep factor to it which i think keeps it difficulty rating. I did not go into 4low but I did not do the last hill accent, there was a group of side-by-sides up top. There are some great camp spots up here.

Author: Official Crew
Status: Open
Offroaded on:
Ran up here in about an hour each way. The rocks in the middle at waypoint 5 are bulldozed out. There are still some rocks to climb on the left. Unfortunately (or fortunately depending on your perspective) Wypoint 16, "dead man's drop" is no more. There are large boulder piles on either side of the road marking where once it scared the mighty. Not even a noticeable shelf there now. I have lowered the difficulty on this trail to easy. However, he loose rocky section to the summit required my rear locker to get up. The last 250 yards are easily climbed on foot should you choose to park at the fork, Waypoint 17, before the loose stuff.

Author:
Status: Open
Offroaded on:
MAJOR update to this trail. I believe due to the fires this summer on Mt Lemmon, most of the obstacles on this trail have been cleared out, I understand why, but as a 4x4er I'm disappointed. Like Dead Man's Drop Obstacle is gone, there's a huge pile off the side of the road where all those rocks were moved to. Also Rocky Outcrop Obstacle was cleared out. The whole trail almost looks like it's graded now. Any obstacle I thought was even the slightest challenge was "fixed" and now any stock vehicle (read no lift and passenger tires) can make it. However the very end to the peak the loose rock climb is still there and is now the only "challenge" on the road, which isn't really a challenge at all. Saw several stock trucks coming down before going up and was like umm..... how did they get up there?!?! Then I learned and am totally disappointed in this trail now.

Questions & Answers (2)

Q: Would this be do able late February? Or still too snowy to run?
–Ross (01/15/2019)
–Jim Long (01/24/2019)
Q: What is the type of dash cam you are using for recording your trips?
–Sean Shifflette (08/26/2018)
–Jim Long (01/24/2019)

Writer Information

Jim Long

Mapping Crew - Arizona

I moved to Arizona in 1984 and bought my first offroad vehicle the next year. I had lots of adventures, seeking out the Old West on paper topo maps in my Toyota FJ40 and can say, fortunately, that I never had to walk home. In 2005 I saw the prototype for the FJ Cruiser, and in the middle of my FJ40 resto project, someone came into my garage with cash and bought it out from under me. (Some regrets) In 2008, I flew out to LA to pick up my FJ Cruiser, special ordered with the Offroad Package (Locker) and MT6. My area of operations has been Southern Arizona, from the New Mexico to California borders. I have been an active member of AZFJ.org where I'm the top post contributor, and have many trail reviews posted there that I plan on enhancing, revisiting and documenting for this authoritative source. I have a login to Ih8Mud and fjcruiserforums but don't lurk there very much. in my career, I've had the pleasure of traveling in Canada, the Caribbean, and Australia but never had the opportunity to wheel there. (bucket list). But, I hope my 30 years of Southern Arizona discovery, teaching and leading people into the backcountry will finally benefit a wider audience here on Trailsoffroad. There's nothing I enjoy more than finding a historic site, a little-used trail that had significance or the opportunity to take that one photo that defines what we do. (I stink but I'm willing to learn). Oh..Added benefit...I'm the GIS analyst for a fire dept and as such have some skills in ArcGIS.
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