Cedar Tree / Tillamook State Forest

Banks, Oregon (Tillamook County)

Last Updated: 08/30/2019
4.5 /5 ( 6 reviews )
Information
Nearby Trails
Status: Open
Typically Open: Year Round
Permit Information: Permit Required - Click Here
Difficulty: 4-5
(MODERATE - DIFFICULT)
Length: 3 miles
Highest Elevation: 2556 feet
Duration: About 1 hour 15 minutes
Shape of Trail: Straight Through
Best Direction to Travel: South
Nearest Town: Banks
Nearest Town w/ Services: Banks
Official Road Name: #14
Management Agency: Tillamook State Forest
District:
Distance:
Showing 0 trails within 2 miles

Highlights

Highlight: Cedar Tree / Tillamook State Forest

Cedar Tree is an aptly named trail deep in the Tillamook State Forest where the highlight is a huge fallen cedar trunk that short enough vehicles can drive underneath. The iconic site of the fallen cedar tree (Waypoint 7) is a favorite place for photographs of 4x4 rigs. Along the way to the cedar tree, the Cedar Tree trail wanders through some of the prettiest and most interesting sections of the forest. A large, deep depression is often filled with water and makes for an interesting challenge to cross. An ancient tree stump hides a shelf that can catch the unsuspecting driver by surprise. Scrambling through a section of trail filled with roots can occasionally result in a damaged suspension or steering mechanism. While stock vehicles can make it through Cedar Tree, careful and attentive driving, and a bit of good spotting will make the drive much more enjoyable. Cedar Tree is one of the highlights of Tillamook State Forest and should not be missed. Just be sure to compare the height of a vehicle to the clearance on the cedar trunk before attempting to go underneath.

Video

Weather

7 day forecast for Cedar Tree / Tillamook State Forest

Route Information

Advanced Rating System

Recommended Vehicle:
Stock SUV with High Clearance and 4 Low
Concerns:
Summary:
The rutted out area at Waypoint 4 and the hidden shelf at Waypoint 5 earn this trail its rating.

Technical Rating: 4-5
(MODERATE - DIFFICULT)

Rocky or undulated road surface. Potential rocks and/or tree stumps less than 24" tall and/or vertical ledges less than 24" tall and/or near vertical ledges or waterfalls less than 54" inches. Tire placement becomes more difficult. Can be steep and off-camber.

Read more about our rating system

Description

Cedar Tree is a challenge for stock vehicles under favorable conditions. Competent and patient spotting will help to ensure that everyone has fun on this trail. The pothole at Waypoint 4 can sometimes have water up to two feet deep which may cause issues for some stock vehicles with low air intakes. The tree stump at Waypoint 6 hides a shelf that could lead to rocker panel damage on vehicles without sufficient flex and ground clearance or armor. Be mindful of the height of vehicles compared to the clearance of the fallen cedar tree when driving underneath it. The obstacle at Waypoint 9 has caused damage to more than one mildly built vehicle with a competent driver and care should be exercised. In spite of these potential difficulties, Cedar Tree is a fun trail that has a lot to offer and should not be missed on a visit to Tillamook State Forest. It is worthwhile to note that this is a Jeep Badge of Honor trail. Note that as with any trail in the Tillamook State Forest, Cedar Tree conditions can change dramatically depending on when the last maintenance was performed on the trail and when the last rain happened. During the rainy season (usually starting in September and lasting through June or July), any trail in the forest can vary from a very benign trail to a wild, highly technical trail in a matter of hours or days. While Trails Offroad tries to represent average trail conditions on every trail in the Tillamook State Forest and regularly updates trail information, caution is always warranted on every trail and gravel road due to constantly changing conditions. The Tillamook State Forest periodically closes trails for a variety of reasons including inclement weather, storm damage, trail maintenance, fire restrictions, logging operations, and a variety of other reasons. While Trails Offroad works hard to convey accurate information on current trail status, trails sometimes close with a locked gate or a barricade without notice. Additionally, trails may be closed by Tillamook State Forest official announcements, but the trails may not be gated off or have physical indications of the closure. The Tillamook State Forest official online blog is the best source of information about these announced and unannounced closures.
This trail can be very busy on summer weekends. Watch for motorcycles, quads, and side-by-sides.

Waypoints

1. Trailhead (0.00 mi)

The trail starts just down the road from the end of University Firepower Part 2. Look for the sign and dirt path that climbs up the hill.

2. Right and then Left to Continue (0.50 mi)

Proceed to the right and then take an immediate left across the gravel road to stay on Cedar Tree.

3. Straight Across the Intersection (0.60 mi)

Go straight across the intersection to remain on Cedar Tree. This is the second crossing of the same gravel spur road. Head to the north on the gravel road to go back to the start of Cedar Tree trail.

4. This Section Can Have Deep Water (1.00 mi)

The pothole at this waypoint can be filled with water up to two feet deep especially after a winter rainstorm. Only after a long, dry summer does this pothole dry out and become a less interesting obstacle. While the last time Trails Offroad ran this trail, there was nothing lurking under the surface of the water, it is prudent to use caution when making this crossing. Be especially mindful of the roots and of wheel placement. There is no bypass to this pothole.

5. Big Stump and Hidden Shelf (1.30 mi)

The big stump hides a shelf just below its roots for those traveling southbound. It is a fun place to test the flex of a vehicle's suspension but an easier line is to stay wide of the tree stump.

6. Straight Across the Intersection (1.40 mi)

Proceed straight across the gravel road and continue on the dirt track to stay on Cedar Tree.

7. Fallen Cedar Tree (1.80 mi)

The iconic fallen cedar tree is a fun place to pose vehicles for photos. However, it is smart to have a spotter watch roof clearance and to go slow when driving under the tree trunk. For instance, the truck in the photos for this waypoint is too tall (7 feet) to fit under the tree because of its roof rack. There is a bypass to one side of the tree trunk.

8. Go Left (2.30 mi)

Go left to stay on Cedar Tree trail. The road to the right eventually connects back to Beaver Dam Road.

9. Obstacle (2.50 mi)

The mass of roots at Waypoint 9 may look relatively benign but it occasionally claims an unsuspecting victim in the form of damaged suspension or steering. The occasional discarded part from a 4x4 serves as a warning to respect this obstacle.

10. End of Trail (3.00 mi)

The trail ends on Saddle Mountain Road. Turn right (west) to head toward Firebreak Five. At the first major four-way gravel road junction, turn right (north) and follow the road down the mountain about a mile to the start of Firebreak Five. The left turn (east) at the end of Cedar Tree dead ends at the edge of Tillamook State Forest about 1000 feet down the road. To exit the trail system of the Tillamook State Forest, turn right (north) and follow the road down the mountain about a mile to a major intersection. Turn right onto Beaver Creek Road and follow the road north for about four miles to Oregon Highway 6.

Directions to Trailhead

Trailhead Coordinates: 45.586125, -123.374263

Starting Point: Banks

From the town of Banks, head west on Oregon Highway 6 toward Tillamook for sixteen miles. Turn left onto Beaver Dam Road (signs for Brown's Camp and Roger's Camp Day Use Area). Follow signs for Brown's Camp (about 1.5 miles from the highway). Take the Powerline #4A trail west following the power lines. At the end of Powerline #4A, proceed to the left along Beaver Dam Road. In 300 feet, continue straight to go onto University Falls Road. A large quarry where people often go shooting is to the left. Head past the quarry and up the hill. Powerline #4B starts on the right side of the gravel road about 500 feet beyond the quarry. Follow Powerline #4B to its end. Next, follow the gravel road to the west down the hill about 500 feet. Then proceed to Powerline #4C which starts on the right side of the gravel road and follow it to its end. Turn left (southeast ) onto University Falls Road and drive approximately one half mile. Continue on University Firepower Part 2 which starts on the right (west) side of University Falls Road just before the large intersection. Cedar Tree trail starts at the end of University Firepower Part 2.

Camping

Dispersed

A few campsites exist along this trail although none is particularly good. Waypoint 7 at the fallen cedar tree is the best camping place (and isn't particularly good) although every vehicle coming on this trail drives right through the camping area. There are several designated campgrounds within the Tillamook State Forest such as Brown’s Camp, Diamond Mill, and Jordan Creek that provide direct access to the 4x4 trails where many recreational users stage their vehicles for multiple days of exploration of the extensive trail network. Other Oregon Department of Forestry campgrounds include Keenig Creek, Jones Creek, Elk Creek, and Gales Creek. On popular summer weekends, campgrounds may occasionally be noisy at night when an un-muffled two stroke engine is fired up unexpectedly. Dispersed camping is generally allowed throughout the forest although restrictions are periodically put in place for areas with active logging; forest, trail, road, or stream restoration projects; and during burn bans. Contact the Tillamook State Forest Ranger Offices in Forest Grove or Tillamook for the most up-to-date information on both dispersed and campground camping. The campgrounds are all open during the busy summer months but only one or two remain open during the winter. On every 4x4 trail that Trails Offroad has mapped in the Tillamook State Forest, there are dispersed camping opportunities although often the areas where people have camped in the past are sub-optimal for a variety of reasons such as being too close to the trail, being in a very wet location, having minimal flat ground for a tent, and other site-specific issues. Logging landings at the end of short spurs off of the gravel roads that crisscross the forest generally provide the most privacy and best opportunities for dispersed camping. On popular weekends in the summer and fall, many logging landings are occupied by campers and 5th wheel trailers. It is advisable to claim a campsite early in the day rather than waiting until the evening.

Camping: Cedar Tree / Tillamook State Forest

Trail Reviews (11)

Author: Official Crew
Status: Open
Offroaded on:
Trails in the Tillamook State Forest are open again after a brief closure due to fire weather. Please be safe out in the forest, carry appropriate fire extinguishing equipment, and don't have open flames. More details are at: http://tillamookstateforest.blogspot.com/2019/08/ohv-trails-open.html

Author: Official Crew
Status: Temporary Closure
Offroaded on:
The Tillamook State Forest is under fire restrictions and all OHV trails are temporarily closed. More information is available at: http://tillamookstateforest.blogspot.com/2019/08/high-fire-danger-level-ohv-trails-closed.html

Author:
Status: Open
Offroaded on:
Rating:
Jeep Badge of Honor Trail! Made the trip from Southern California to wheel the two Jeep BOH trails in the Tillamook State Forest (this and Firebreak 5). Weather was sunny and trail was dry. The trail was fairly easy. Not technically challenging but the trail is narrow and has sharp turns at some spots. Beware of huge tree roots that do stick out of the ground. They can jolt your rig pretty good if you take too sharp of a turn or not paying attention. Being from Southern California, this trail was one of the densest forest trails I've ever encountered (which made it exciting for me at least). The highlight of the trail, of course, was the giant fallen cedar tree (which I was unable to drive under w/ my rig setup). The pics I took (along with the JBOH badge) throughout the trail were worth the visit.

Author:
Status: Open
Offroaded on:
Rating:
I have left a few reviews for Browns camp area after visiting this past week and I feel like I keep saying the same thing, it was a little bit of a let down. The only exciting thing on this trail was one of our rigs snagged a tire on a sharp root sticking out. It caused a small tear and leak in the sidewall. Overall this trail was very easy in two full size rigs (Tahoe and F250LD) as well as two 4runners and a Tacoma (not sure where they falls on the size spectrum (mid size maybe?). It was pretty much a two wheel drive trail. All the "difficult" spots are shown in photos above. We had a good time, but were looking for something with some challenge to it.

Author:
Status: Open
Offroaded on:
Rating:
It's a narrow trail but didn't have any issues with a stock Jeep Rubicon. It was sunny dry conditions. I honestly expected it to be harder for it's rating on the Badge of Honor app but not bad! It was fun.

Author:
Status: Open
Offroaded on:
Rating:
Very dry but great riding. In my stock XJ the "Obstacle" (Waypoint #9) was a bit of a challenge. Got stuck for a second, until we rocked her back about two feet or so and got traction. We went on the right side of the roots as the clearance on the left worried me for the stock height. An hour journey length was about the right estimate. Fun but definitely challenging.

Author: Official Crew
Status: Open
Offroaded on:
The trail has re-opened after the fire closure: http://tillamookstateforest.blogspot.com/2018/08/tsf-ohv-trails-re-open-on-august-1-2018.html

Author: Official Crew
Status: Temporary Closure
Offroaded on:
Rating:
Temporarily closed due to fire danger. It should be reopened when the rains come back: http://tillamookstateforest.blogspot.com/2018/07/tsf-ohv-trails-closing-on-wednesday.html

Author:
Status: Open
Offroaded on:
Great adventure in the snow. Grip was low on the snow packed areas but in the muddy sections you could get a good drive up or around corners to regain that forward momentum. Advise having rock sliders in the snow due to hidden objects and sliding into stumps/rocks.

Author: Official Crew
Status: Open
Offroaded on:
It was a fun, wet, and muddy time on Cedar Tree last Friday. Someone cut out a tree that fell down into the road near Waypoint 4. With all of the wind we'll be getting this winter, it's not a bad idea to carry a saw and be ready to cut your way through trails, especially if you're running a trail during the week.

Author: Official Crew
Status: Open
Offroaded on:
Rating:
This is a fun, muddy trail through the woods. My truck can pose for pictures under the cedar tree but it's too tall to drive all the way through underneath. Good thing there's a bypass.

Questions & Answers (2)

Q: How do I use the downloaded GPX file? Can it be use on my iPhone or iPad?
–Dave “Pappywags” Wagner (06/21/2019)
A: Yes, you can use the GPX file on your iPhone or iPad with an app. Try going to the Apple app store and searching for "GPX" There are a whole bunch of different apps that you can use. Choose your favorite :-)
–Douglas Van Bossuyt (06/21/2019)
Q: Do I need a permit to drive with my jeep through the trails of Tillamook?
–Yasser (10/24/2018)
A: If you are off the gravel fire road (on the trails), then you need an Oregon ATV permit. They're only $10 though. https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/ATV/Pages/Permits.aspx
–Douglas Van Bossuyt (10/25/2018)

Writer Information

Douglas Van Bossuyt

Mapping Crew - Oregon

Douglas grew up riding in the back of pickups in Oregon and California. He comes from a long line of overlanders and adventurers dating back to the Mayflower and the Oregon Trail. During a stint working in Colorado, Douglas fell in love with the offroad scene and immediately gravitated toward the Toyota crowd. His first 4x4 was a 1988 Toyota 4runner nicknamed Goldilocks. After a year of running many of the iconic trails throughout the front range in the fully stock Goldilocks running on bald tires, it was time for an upgrade. Goldilocks went off to a new home and the Albino Rhino came home. The Albino Rhino is a built 1986 Toyota 4runner ready for any adventure anywhere at any time. During the week, Douglas works on systems engineering and architecture problems in California. Douglas also enjoys backpacking -- especially in the central Sierras in California -- scuba diving along the Oregon and California coasts, and riding his motorcycle on the Pacific Coast Highway. Most weeknights you can find Douglas under his truck in the driveway performing maintenance or fixing the latest trail damage.
For individual use only, not to be shared.